Category: Trail Tip

#TrailTip Tuesday: Sappy Paws

Hiking With Dog

It happens when you hike among the trees. It can be extremely uncomfortable if tree sap gets on your dog’s fur between the toes. The sap picks up all the tiny debris it touches and glues everything together between the toes. Here you can see two of Xena’s toes are stuck together. Small debris gets wedged

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#TrailTip Tuesday: Difficulty Level

Hiking With Dog

Almost all of my trail write-ups include Difficulty Rating in the stats so you can decide if the hike is right for your fitness level. So what does each of the levels really mean? Keep in mind that not all hiking blogs and websites use the same rating system. That means the same hike can

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#TrailTip Tuesday: Lightly Trafficked

Hiking With Dog

When you research trail info, sometimes the description says the trail is lightly trafficked. If you are new to researching hiking trails, besides the obvious meaning, here is what you need to know. Since the trail is less traveled, it’s more than likely you will find the trail less maintained than the ones you are used

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#TrailTip Tuesday: Say No To Injuries

Hiking With Dog

Like any workout, it’s important to stretch before a hike to prevent injuries. For post-hike stretches, check out our 6 Yoga Poses Every Hiker Should Know.   Get Our Latest Comprehensive Dog-friendly Trail List Here. Enjoy! Happy Hiking! SAVE 10% on all outdoor gear and apparel at Outdoorplay.com! Use coupon code AV10 at checkout. Coupon Code:

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#TrailTip Tuesday: Drinking Problem?

Hiking With Dog

Some dogs refuse to drink from a hydration bladder or a water bottle even if they are thirsty. Does this sound like your dog? If you hike or travel often with your dog, I recommend getting a collapsible bowl. A water bowl is one of the essential gear when hiking with a dog. Just be sure

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#TrailTip Tuesday: Do You Need Trekking Poles?

Hiking With Dog

Trekking poles are not just for old people, women, or people with weak knees. There are many benefits to using trekking poles when you hike. These are some of the advantages I personally enjoy. 1. Total body workout Your lower body has to carry your weight plus the weight of the backpack. Why not put

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